Instructor training

Copy of DSC_0022.JPGProviding training and program orientation for all of your instructors is critical for your program to achieve its short and long-term outcomes. At a minimum, program managers should review program goals and objectives with all instructors, guides and mentors. The format of this review is highly variable, but most managers of existing programs designate a specific time prior to the start of the program to review this material with their instructors. A general overview of the program, its schedule, and key elements and timing of soliciting participant feedback and evaluations are also advisable. 

For most current programs, instructors have been carefully selected by, and are well known to, program managers, so the need for additional training may not be as critical as it would be if less well-known instructors were selected. However, virtually every instructor could benefit from additional training.

Topics for additional training include:

Brief reviews of this information are provided in sections following this overview.

Providing training on the Outdoor Recreation Adoption Model has proven to be very useful for even the most veteran instructors because it allows instructors to see your program in the full context of what it takes to make a hunter or angler.  This context has also allowed instructors to see their role in a very different light, and in many situations has positively improved their interactions with participants. 

For in-depth information on the Outdoor Recreation Adoption Model see National Shooting Sports Foundation’s Best Practices Workbook for Hunting and Shooting Recruitment and Retention and the National Hunting & Shooting Sports Action Plan (Second Content Draft).

Resources

Instructor/Mentor Post Training Surveys - Hunting

Introduction
The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is working with Responsive Management, a professional survey research firm, to evaluate participant, instructor, and mentor experiences with the Field to Fork program.

As an instructor, we would like to know your opinions on the effectiveness of the program. Your responses will help improve the Field to Fork program—thanks in advance for your input.

Instructor/Mentor Surveys - Fishing

Introduction
The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is working with Responsive Management, a professional survey research firm, to evaluate participant, instructor, and mentor experiences with the [PROGRAM NAME].

As an instructor, we would like to know your opinions on the effectiveness of the program. Your responses will help improve the [PROGRAM NAME]—thanks in advance for your input.

Mentoring - Best Practices Workbook For Hunting and Shooting Recruitment and Retention

Mentors provide an important mechanism for new participants to develop technical skills, as well as the social competence to become a long-term hunter or shooter. The concept of being socially competent may be new to some planners of Recruitment and Retention (R&R) programs. This is a fancy term for understanding and adopting the norms of behavior, etiquette, and belief system of hunters or shooters. These attitudes and beliefs, while often very subtle, are important to “fit in” with the group – to see yourself as a hunter or shooter (Coy, 1989).