The National Hunting & Shooting Action Plan - Second Content Draft (4/1/2016)

Preview image of Strategies_2016_03_10mar_v4.pdf

The National Hunting & Shooting Action Plan - Second Content Draft (4/1/2016)

Participation in hunting and, until recently, the shooting sports has been steadily declining since the
1980s. The decline in these activities, which sustain a multi-billion-dollar industry and provide
the primary financial support for state-level wildlife conservation in the U.S., poses an everincreasing
threat to wildlife conservation. Early in the 20th century, sportsmen and -women, as well as
conservation leaders recognized the critical need for a significant and sustainable source of funding for
wildlife management. The revenue generated through the sale of licenses and sporting arms equipment
has provided the foundation for the most successful model of wildlife conservation in the world.
According to recent conservative estimates, there are approximately 13.7 million hunters and more
than 40 million shooting sports participants in the U.S.

Their combined activities support more than
1.5 million jobs annually and have produced nearly $110 billion in economic output. Thanks to an excise
tax on sporting arms and ammunition established in 1937, hunters and recreational shooters have
generated more than $10.5 billion for the conservation of wildlife and its habitat. In recognition of
this, state fish and wildlife agencies, conservation and shooting sports organizations, and the hunting/
shooting sports industry have invested heavily in recruitment, retention, and reactivation (R3) initiatives
in an effort to reverse the decline in participation. Unfortunately, the results of those efforts have
been met with limited success and the general consensus among stakeholders is that a more strategic
approach to sustaining the population of hunting and shooting sports participants is critically needed.
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